Research Rockstars Video Contest Tips and Resources

Are you wondering how can you communicate your research in a way that will be remembered? What tools can you use to capture your audience's attention?
 

Here are some great resources and tutorials about making research videos and telling a video story:
https://www.jove.com/blog/2017/05/08/10-tips-for-making-a-great-research-video/
https://connection.sagepub.com/blog/sage-connection/2015/03/03/how-to-make-your-science-video-popular-on-youtube/
https://www.universityaffairs.ca/career-advice/career-advice-article/how-grad-students-can-effectively-tell-their-research-story/
http://www.mayaproject.org/blog/2015/11/15/how-to-turn-your-research-findings-into-a-video-that-people-want-to-watch
How to turn written text into an animated video:
https://plotagon.com
How to make a video research summary on an iPHone:
http://blog.impactstory.org/impact-challenge-video-abstract/
Examples of 3-minute Grad Slam presentations from past winners:
https://gradslam.universityofcalifornia.edu/past-winners/
How to post videos on YouTube:
https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/57407?co=GENIE.Platform=Desktop&hl=en&oco=1
Getting Royalty-free music:
You can do a Google search for royalty-free music. Note that you have to pay for some tracks – Shutterstock and Audioblocks for example – but many sites just want a citation.
https://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/2
https://www.hooksounds.com
 

Creating Good Videos to publicize your research project using Social Media:

  1. What are you trying to say? Take ten minutes, and write out the main point of your video. Is it about a person? A class? Think about the core of the story you’re trying to tell and give it some words.
  2. Who will be the voice of your video? Is the story told by you? Or someone you’re planning to interview?
  3. Keep the message of the video simple. In video, people often try and cram multiple stories/messages into one video. The medium works best when it hits an emotional level. What does the story mean to you? Your subject?
  4. Shoot some good b-roll. This mean, shots you can use to edit over who is speaking. So, if someone is describing their favorite spot on campus, what shots could you get to cover up some of the words?
  5. Shoot wide, medium and close-up shots, with a tripod, if possible.
  6. No waterhosing! Meaning, don’t shoot everything from one standing position. Move around the room. Get close to things. Move the camera close to things.
  7. Try and find a quiet-ish place to shoot. Keep in mind, other people talking, music playing in the background, televisions and telephones all make distracting sounds that take viewers out of your story. Pull your person (or yourself) someplace quiet and shoot your interview there.
  8. Have fun!